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Nuclear Engineering Overview - Preparation - Day In The Life - Earnings - Employment - Career Path Forecast - Professional Organizations 


Career Path Forecast
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, nuclear engineers are expected to have employment growth of 11 percent between 2008 and 2018, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

Most job growth will be in research and development and engineering services. Although no commercial nuclear power plants have been built in the United States for many years, increased interest in nuclear power as an energy source will spur demand for nuclear engineers to research and develop new designs for reactors.

They also will be needed to work in defense-related areas, to develop nuclear medical technology, and to improve and enforce waste management and safety standards. Nuclear engineers are expected to have good employment opportunities because the small number of nuclear engineering graduates is likely to be in rough balance with the number of job openings.

 

 

 

Note: Some resources in this section are provided by the American Nuclear Society, and the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.


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