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Atmospheric Science Overview - Preparation - Day In The Life - Earnings - Employment - Career Path Forecast - Professional Organizations -
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Employment
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, atmospheric scientists hold about 9,400 jobs in the United States. Although several hundred people teach atmospheric science and related courses in college and university departments of meteorology or atmospheric science, physics, earth science, or geophysics, these individuals are classified as college or university faculty, rather than atmospheric scientists.

The Federal Government is the largest single employer of civilian meteorologists, accounting for about 34 percent. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) employs most Federal meteorologists in National Weather Service stations throughout the Nation; the remainder of NOAA's meteorologists work mainly in research and development or management. The U.S. Department of Defense employs several hundred civilian meteorologists. In addition to civilian meteorologists, hundreds of Armed Forces members are involved in forecasting and other meteorological work. Others work for professional, scientific, and technical services firms, including private weather consulting services; radio and television broadcasting; air carriers; and state governments.

Note: Some resources in this section are provided by the the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
 


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